Of fragile messiahs and micro-corruption

It's probably unfair but not unlikely that people will conclude that India’s campaign against corruption stalled in Bombay. While 15,000 people braved the Delhi chill to express their support for Anna Hazare, less than 5,000 turned up at the Bandra-Kurla Complex (the original site, Azad Maidan, was considered too small; several of the city’s federalised … Continue reading Of fragile messiahs and micro-corruption

Down with Margaret Mead: evaluating the Big Society

When I hear the inanity of Margaret Mead's "never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world...." leave someone's mouth, I want to clobber them over the head with an oversized banana. When they smugly conclude with it, like it's the truism to end all arguments,  I want to stitch … Continue reading Down with Margaret Mead: evaluating the Big Society

In The Black Labour: urgent but uninspiring

Cook et al's In the Black Labour for The Policy Network  makes for discomfiting but urgent reading for all centre-Left thinkers. It signals that the game is up for Keynesian bravado. It highlights two painful truths that all Labourites will have to face up to:  fiscal conservatism is here to stay, and welfarism is dead. … Continue reading In The Black Labour: urgent but uninspiring

austerity and social innovation

Amid the gloom of protracted, relentless austerity, it's easy to lose sight of the economic value of social innovation. Social innovation shouldn't be thought of as a boomtime luxury or an expensive mode of social experimentation, but as a new approach to an unmet social need that has the potential to reap economic rewards by meeting these needs in more … Continue reading austerity and social innovation